Video Interview: Griffin Gluck & Hallea Jones Talk Locke & Key Season 2

Locke & KeyOn season two of Locke & Key, the demon Dodge has taken on the form of a student at Matheson Academy, Gabe, played by Griffin Gluck, in order to get closer to Kinsey (Emilia Jones) and both recover the keys and hopefully make one of his own. He is helped by Eden, played by Hallea Jones, who at the end of last season was struck with demonic Whispering Iron and possessed.

During a recent roundtable with the press, the two talked to Jamie Ruby of SciFi Vision about where they drew inspiration for their portrayals from besides the script. Gluck said that he watched interviews as well as a lot of television and movies to find characters who would be considered psychopaths. “I watched a lot of interviews with evil characters, and I think one that I sort of might not necessarily have drawn a lot from, but got really inspired [by], was actually Christian Bale in [American Psycho]… I think Gabe is very much a psychopath as much as he is a demon. He's just he's dead inside, and I think he's uncomfortable with emotion. I find that to be terrifying…I remember just watching a lot of TV, a lot of movies, and just finding characters that had really just psychopathic behaviors and trying to emanate that in any way I could.”

For Jones, it was Regina George in Mean Girls for season one and also Megan Fox in Jennifer’s Body for season two.  “Regina George was my season one for sure influence, and of course I wanted to make Eden not Regina George like as much as possible, but there's only so many ways that you can spin the popular mean girl. So, with season two, it was nice to combine the Jennifer's Body perspective as well. I mean, Megan Fox is just iconic, just point blank, period, so it was fun to kind of like be like, ‘How crazy can I go?’ She's such a great icon for that kind of blood-loving crazy girl thing.”

For more, be sure to watch our portion of the video interview and read the full transcript below. Locke & Key is available to stream now on Netflix.




Zoom Interview
Locke & Key
Griffin Gluck and Hallea Jones

October 14, 2021


QUESTION:  
I think one of my favorite things about this season is in a lot of ways you guys are playing dual roles. You're playing your facade, but you're also playing the real villain beneath. I wanted to ask about the challenges in doing a dual role and whether it was difficult and how much fun you guys were having doing it?

GRIFFIN GLUCK:   I was actually just thinking about this. I can't believe I haven't mentioned it yet, but we've talked a lot about how fun it is to play an evil character. It's something you don't get to do often. It's out of the realm of the ordinary, which I think is a lot of fun. For an actor, it's a real challenge, which, I've always enjoyed a thing that's a little bit out of my comfort zone, because there's no growth in the comfort zone, and there's no comfort in the growth zone. So, it was definitely a challenge, but one that I was so excited to take on.

I actually wrote my college paper, or one of my college papers - I remember I was asked, who [I looked] up to in my profession, and the first person I thought of was actually Andy Serkis. You might know him as Gollum or Caesar in Planet of the Apes. I don't know why, but I always just thought he was the best actor ever, because any actor in Hollywood, they can draw from real life scenarios to play whoever they're playing, whether it be someone going through divorce or a breakup or someone that's having a hard time with their job, you know, whatever the normal standard romcom, sort of role is, which I've got to play many of thankfully. But this is a lot more fun, because what's so cool about Andy Serkis, is he has to completely figure out what that character is completely on his own. No one really knows what it's like to be a completely sentient ape. No one knows what it's like to be a little monster. And I think that's what's so fun in these little challenges that, sure, they might be hard, and it might be difficult to figure out how to toe that line, but you really get to involve yourself so much more into the character and make so many more things your own, because it's not real. So, whatever you perceive to be the right thing in that scenario is the right thing. So, it's hard, but you get a lot of creative liberty, and it's so rewarding to see a character to come to life after you've done all that. And I've been meaning to mention Andy Serkis for the last two days, so I'm so glad I finally got the opportunity to.

QUESTION:   …Hallea, how about yourself?

HALLEA JONES:   …Well Eden just like doesn't really care, but she knows that you kind of have to. So, a lot of season two is Eden being like, “I really don't want to hide myself, but I know that if I expose that [I’m] a demon, Gabe is gonna have his say on not being very pleased about that.” So, it's fun playing. It was incredible playing the demon element, which was just so unhinged and chaotic, but I loved being able to kind of sprinkle in little moments in the day to day of like the school Eden. And I actually worked with the costume designer, Megan, to reflect [it in] my outfits, Eden's outfits, with her school self versus her demon self. Her demons self is much darker and more kind of like just sexier in ways. Then, with school, it's more colorful and whatnot to try to fit in. So, it [is] reflected in the outfits, and I'm hoping that the audience sees how it might reflect in the show and the scenes that I do with everyone who doesn't know that she's a demon. So, yeah, but it was all fun.

QUESTION:   I noticed the season is, obviously, chock full of action, and there're special effects. So, can you tell me a little bit about [how] kind of the things are ramped up. How did you feel about, you know, you're kind of a school girl and all you guys are proper, and then now you're just all over the place murdering.

HALLEA JONES:   It was fun to step out of the realm of normality of what us mortal humans are allowed to do in our day to day. There were so many times that I would just be like, “Oh, my God, this is my job.” I got to be crazy. I got to be chaotic. I got to be just absolutely problematic and gutty and lawless. Like Eden just runs crazy. So, I really enjoyed just pushing the limits on like what I thought Eden could be, and the writers really helped so much with just laying a great foundation for that.

Griffin GluckGRIFFIN GLUCK:   …There's nothing that Hallea said that I would not also say. There's nothing more fun than being able to go to set and just go crazy for ten hours, fourteen hours a day, just unleashed. I've recently compared it to sort of like an anger room where you get to go in and break a bunch of things and just having this like release, and I'd say it's sort of similar from an actor's standpoint where you get to go into work every day and just have this crazy release where you get to - I mean, I was thinking about it. There were a couple times this season where I just had to scream at the top of my lungs and just get really mad at people and just genuinely scream, and I don't think I've ever once in my life just fully screamed at the top of my lungs, because there's no really scenario where that's okay. Usually you can't just go out in public and yell your lungs out. So, it was very similar. It was a very cathartic experience being able to go to set and just unleash this crazy side that I think a lot of people kind of keep bottled up. And I'm not saying I want to go out and yell at people all day, but it's definitely a fun opportunity to sort of have that release where you can just kind of go crazy and that way you don't have to do it in real life. You can you can have fun and try it out and not ever have to do it to as a real person. I promise I'm not crazy. I don't feel like going and yelling at people, but it’s fun.

SCIFI VISION:   So, what I want to know is other than getting this stuff from the script, where else did you guys pull from? Like are there villains maybe that you thought of as you're creating [the characters]?...Something else you kind of drew from?

HALLEA JONES:   Mine was Megan Fox in Jennifer’s Body and Regina George in Mean Girls. Mean Girls [and] Regina George was my season one for sure influence, and of course I wanted to make Eden not Regina George like as much as possible, but there's only so many ways that you can spin the popular mean girl. So, with season two, it was nice to combine the Jennifer's Body perspective as well. I mean, Megan Fox is just iconic, just point blank, period, so it was fun to kind of like be like, “How crazy can I go?” She's such a great icon for that kind of blood-loving crazy girl thing.

GRIFFIN GLUCK:   Yeah, for me, I think it's funny; I watched a lot of interviews with evil characters, and I think one that I sort of might not necessarily have drawn a lot from, but got really inspired [by], was actually Christian Bale in - someone helped me out here. Hallea?

QUESTION:   American Psycho?

GRIFFIN GLUCK:  Thank you so much.

HALLEA JONES:   I was going to say Psycho, and I was like that's there's another word in there.

GRIFFIN GLUCK:   Yeah, Christian Bale, American Psycho. I watched an interview that he did about what inspiration he drew from there, and I thought it was the funniest thing. He mentioned how he watched interviews of Tom Cruise, actually, just being himself in regular interviews that he did. And he was like, “It was terrifying for me to watch, because although there was this bright and bubbly personality on the outside, he was just dead behind the eyes.” He's like, “I found that terrifying.” So, apparently that's what he drew from for American Psycho. I hope I'm not butchering that, but that’s the story that I remember. And I thought that was really interesting, tiny little subtleties and people's mannerisms and behaviors that are just terrifying that you wouldn't normally think of, but stuff that kind of sets a psychopath apart from from a regular person. And I think Gabe is very much a psychopath as much as he is a demon. He's just he's dead inside, and I think he's uncomfortable with emotion. I find that to be terrifying. So, I can't think of any. I definitely had references going into into season two, and it's unfortunate that I can't think of them right now, but I remember just watching a lot of TV, a lot of movies, and just finding characters that had really just psychopathic behaviors and trying to emanate that in any way I could.

QUESTION:   Griffin, your character in season two was just so focused on designing the key. So, if you could design a key, what intention would you infuse it with?

GRIFFIN GLUCK:   You know, I was thinking about this. I've been thinking about this, and just like how [with] the mending cabinet you need the cabinet itself and the key. You put something broken in there to fix it. I would definitely love to create a two piece, you know, key and box special, but, I think, for me, I would want to create a cabinet or something like that, that would just be anything you imagined would show up in the box, kind of like a magic oven or something. If I was really hungry, I could just stick the key in, and there's a freshly baked pot pie in front of me that I could devour.

HALLEA JONES:   Like Mary Poppins’s bag.

GRIFFIN GLUCK:   Yeah, the new Xbox. Can't find that thing anywhere. I just imagine that thing up and bam, there it is, right there. I think an imagination cabinet would be pretty cool.

QUESTION:   And how about you, Hallea?

Hallea JonesHALLEA JONES:   I was thinking the other day that a spin on the music box key would be to have like a radio or something that will just play any music that you actually want to hear. Even if you don't know what you want to hear in the moment, it will just know. Because so many times I like sift through playlists, and [I’m] just like, “I'm not feeling it. [What] do I want to hear? I don't know.” So, it’d be nice to have a radio. It's really lame, but music is such a big part of my life that I'm like, “I just want something to know what my soul wants to hear right now.” That would be mine. [laughs…And also the cabinet he's making. I want that one too.

GRIFFIN GLUCK:  You can use it whenever, man.

HALLEA JONES:   Okay, cool.

QUESTION:   So, Eden has to eat a lot this season, like a lot a lot…How was that for you? Did it make you sick on set? What was the experience like?

HALLEA JONES:   Oh my gosh, I just I love food. I love snacking. First season I would just always be at the craft table just snacking and stuff. So, I had a really bad habit that I quickly learned to work against of just like, you know, in between takes just having some more popcorn or having like a little bite of pizza or whatever it is. And it got to the point where we would have to do upwards of seven takes, probably way more than that, because we would have to turn around; maybe I'd be in the background, or whatever. So, I was constantly eating, and Eden and doesn't take small bites. So, the problem would be we would start the scene, and I would be completely just shoving food in my mouth. Then, I'd have to swallow it in order to get to my line. So, it was interesting to kind of learn the best way to do that kind of thing. I ate a lot, a lot of food, to the point where I was like, “No more.”

GRIFFIN GLUCK:   It was impressive. No, it was genuinely impressive.

HALLEA JONES:  Thank you. But there were many times where it was just not very tasty by the end of it, and I just haven't looked at that kind of food in a while. I'm just like, “No more popcorn, please. I don't want any more popcorn.”

QUESTION:   So, I know we don't want to probably bring up all of what's been happening through COVID, but because you guys were kind of in an isolated situation, and you relied on your group there of fellow actors and crew...because you have such intense characters...maybe you were able to focus more; having these types of characters kind of was maybe easier to play? Or can tell me a little bit about your process?

GRIFFIN GLUCK:   I really have to say, I think having this production during COVID was a blessing. I don't mean that in the sense that COVID helped the production, but definitely in the sense that being through this production, even with all of the complicated situations that we got in - luckily we made it through the whole show without a shutdown, which was just absolutely fantastic. Hats off to the crew and the cast for for staying safe, and I just was so thankful, but I think having some sort of sense of normalcy during COVID was really just fantastic for my mental health. I had something to strive for, where I would otherwise just be inside all day, which I do not thrive in that environment. I really do thrive on it on a set like this. And even with the the frustrations from COVID, I don't even think it was the characters that got the benefit of that; I think [I] personally got the benefit of being able to go into work and scream and just have have a good time during a time where so many people were suffering. I just feel so thankful that we got to do that, because I don't know where I would be without without season two. So, I don't know if it necessarily helped me with my character, but it definitely helped. I think the character definitely helped me with myself.

HALLEA JONES:   Yeah, same here. I don't thrive in an isolated situation for a long period of time. I love my solitude, but just for the long period of time, it was really difficult, and I just feel so grateful that I was able to spend time with such an incredible production who became kind of like a family over the eight months, because we weren't able to see anyone else, and I'm actually really grateful for it...Just everything that was happening was devastating. What I'm grateful for was that it taught me the way that I like to work as a young actor getting into this industry. It's easy when when the world's open to just be like, “Yeah, I'm working on this show. I have a couple bucks in my bank; let's go and hang out and see friends,” and stuff like that, but with this, it was eight months of just like go to work, come home, take care, self care, go to work, go home, take care, self care, and that was so important for me personally, which I think rubbed off on Eden in certain ways. But the same with Griffin, that I feel like my own mental health was the beneficiary of the experience of filming during lockdown.

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