Syfy Press Tour: "Being Human" Cast On Season 3 & Bishop's Return

By Jamie Ruby

Being HumanSyfy's Being Human originally premiered the beginning of 2011 and immediately did great in the ratings. It also caught the largest female audience. As the summer series ends, Powerful Mondays will continue into the new year with this scripted series.

The Being Human cast, including Sam Witwer, Meaghan Rath, and Sam Huntington, recently attended the Syfy Digital Press Tour in Orlando, Florida and talked to the press about the upcoming season.

Being HumanAccording to the female lead of the series, Rath, who plays Sally, the ghost, the second season of the show, which airs Monday, January 16th, continues to break even more away in terms of storyline from the original BBC series from which it is based. It also will become much darker this season. Rath joked, "It should be called "Being Human, Welcome to the Dark Side."

Huntington, who plays Josh, the werewolf, agrees and tells us that the characters' story lines will diverge somewhat this season from one another. "We kind of all go off on our own independent paths this year, respective paths, that are all obviously interlaced with one another, but they are quite dark." He continues that much of it deals with whether or not their characters' "let the temptation in."

Josh also has some new romance coming this year. "A romance from his past comes back in an unexpected way." He adds, however, that Nora is still a big part of his life. "[It] gets very, very complicated when said romance from his past comes back. And it's cool for Josh because his need and his wants in life is the thing that he finds most difficult to achieve. And hurting other people is his biggest fear. And he's a lover, and so it's really, really difficult for him."

According to Witwer, who stars as Aiden, the vampire, a lot of his character issues in the second season have to do with identity issues. He also adds that this year, the series will take Aidan back to the '30s, where vampires didn't have to hide as hard as they do today. The show will also go back to 1918. "We discover Aidan perhaps at the height of his influence and power, and he's doing really, really well. And we learn why they were all scattered and sent into the shadows and they all hide.

"And so, as I talk about this identity thing, we really get a strong contrast for who Aidan was and this ideal Aidan. Everyone is talking about him, and you get to see him. And they talk about he was the ideal vampire, and then of course we know a lot about how Aidan is trying to be in these last two years."

Witwer continues that Aidan keeps having his options and avenues of escape taken away from him. "And once you have all of your options taken away, you really do learn who you really are, not who you want to be and not who you were, but who you are. And that's one of the scary things that he goes through this season."

Rath says that Sally will be dealing with the fact that her door is now missing. "She's dealing also with a lot of temptation in regards to her exploring more of the rules of the afterlife and really sort of discovering new things that she can do and coming into new powers, a lot of which are very dangerous and addictive and painful for people around her."

Rath also talks about Sally trying to find purpose in her death. "...Her goal in life [was] to have an effect on somebody and feel like she's contributing in some way to the world, and that never happened. So, in her death, her longings are the same. She wants to feel important and special and unique, and so she falls for someone who is living in life and tries to be with him and will do whatever it takes to be with him, which also falls into the whole dangerous category that we were talking about before."

The trio also discuss some of the guest cast this season, including Dichen Lachman, who plays Suran, a very old vampire, who is also Aidan's old love interest. Another guest star is Kyle Schmidt, who will play Henry.

Other news the cast reveals is that Bishop, played by Mark Pellegrino, will be back this season. Witwer teased, "After all, we have 200 years of history [with] that guy. So you never know when he just kind of shows up. And Mark Pellegrino, he's tremendous, that guy. He's fun."

Huntington adds, "Mark has been back in a small capacity this year and it's just been so awesome."
 
To read the full interview, you can read the transcript below. Also stay tuned for more exclusive photos and interviews with the Being Human cast.


Syfy Digital Press Tour
Being Human
Sam Witwer, Meagan Rath, and Sam Huntington

October 10, 2011
9:30 AM ET

MARK STERN: ...The first panel, "Being Human," has been a breakout hit for us. It premiered last year, the beginning of the year, and was immediately a ratings winner. It also caught the largest female audience for an original scripted series, which was a real accomplishment for us. And I think it also—what was great about it was it really laid claim to Monday as a big night for us and really became the genesis for the most Powerful Mondays. And so we are going to continue Powerful Mondays into the new year.

(Telephone app played of the sound of a horse race.)

And that's the news. Season 2 premieres Monday, January 16th, at 9 p.m. And let me bring up—let me bring up the cast. So I will say Season 2, also, we are just into the beginning of production. We are about five or six episodes in, and these scripts—and we are obviously that much farther along with the scripts. What's really great about this season, even more so than last, is it really has done a great job of really defining itself even more from the BBC series and broken away. And Jeremy has done an phenomenal job of just really establishing a tone for this show that defines itself and really distinguishes itself from the BBC series, which we love, but I think a big effort has been to have this step out on its own. And it really does this year. Okay. Without further ado, let me welcome to the stage Sam Witwer, Meaghan Rath, and Sam Huntington.

(Applause.)

So we decided to—

SAM HUNTINGTON: This is just—I don't know—pretty awesome.

SAM WITWER: Free water and everything.

SAM HUNTINGTON: What am I supposed to do with two of these, Mark?

Being HumanSAM WITWER: You dual-fist it. You just, boom, boom.

MARK STERN: You really don't want him to answer that question. So last year when we showed the clips and then everyone, like, ran out because I hadn't seen the clip. So you've got your own monitor. So we are going to play the clip now with everyone up on stage so you don't have to jump down off stage.

MEAGHAN RATH: Okay. Cool.

SAM HUNTINGTON: That was dangerous last year.

SAM WITWER: Yeah. I almost sued, but then I was like, "I'm fine. I'm actually fine."

SAM HUNTINGTON: Well, if you had hurt yourself—

MARK STERN: Okay. Wait.

SAM HUNTINGTON: I'm sorry.

MARK STERN: I know. There is a lot more of this to come. So before we go there, let's watch the clip.

(Clip shown.)

MARK STERN: Okay. So there's a really big monitor here, but it doesn't work.

SAM WITWER: That is a lie. It was basically just to keep us calm for a moment.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah.

MARK STERN: Yeah, just to keep you from jumping in and then I jump in.

SAM WITWER: Yeah.

MARK STERN: All right. So we are going to—I've got a couple of questions for these guys, and then we are going to open it up to your questions. And then, at the end of these panels, we are going to bring our panels down over to the side of the stage so that I give you 10 minutes of kind of more one-on-one time with them before we start the next panel. So that's kind of how the day is going to work. So let's start. So, Season 2, what can we expect, and what's going on?

SAM HUNTINGTON: I thought we were just remaking Season 1.

SAM WITWER: Yeah, yeah.

SAM HUNTINGTON: That was the—I mean, we were shooting—

SAM WITWER: We were adapting Season 1.

MEAGHAN RATH: It's a re-imagining.

MARK STERN: And then, when what didn't happen, what happened?

SAM HUNTINGTON: Right.

SAM WITWER: Crazy stuff. It gets really dark this year.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah.

SAM WITWER: We mean really, really dark this year.

MEAGHAN RATH: Yeah. It should be called "Welcome to the Dark Side"—"Being Human, Welcome to the Dark Side."

SAM WITWER: "Welcome to the Dark Side."

SAM HUNTINGTON: The dark side of Being Human, yeah.

MEAGHAN RATH: This time it's personal.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah, "Transformers: Dark of Being Human."

SAM WITWER: "Dark of Being Human."

MARK STERN: This is, like, a little more than that. So, I mean, that's fantastic. You've obviously been very well prepped.

(Laughter.)

SAM HUNTINGTON: Well, I can say that we kind of all go off on our own independent paths this year, respective paths, that are all obviously interlaced with one another, but yeah, they are quite dark. I think we all had a tremendous amount of growth in the first season. It was kind of leading up to all of us making decisions about whether to kind of, as the ad clearly stipulates, let the temptation in, and I think that—I can speak for my character anyway—it's really—a lot of it is really about to try to keep others away from the temptation. So it's a lot of clinging on to what I—what I want, which is normalcy. So—

MEAGHAN RATH: Yeah. I think for—I'll speak for Sally. In Season 2, she's dealing with—I mean, we pick up—what is it? -- a month after—

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah.

MEAGHAN RATH: -- we left off?

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah, roughly.

MEAGHAN RATH: So, for Sally, she's dealing with the consequences of missing her door and what that means to her. She's dealing also with a lot of temptation in regards to her exploring more of the rules of the afterlife and really sort of discovering new things that she can do and coming into new powers, a lot of which are very dangerous and addictive and painful for people around her. And so she's battling with that a lot and meeting a lot of new characters. I think there's tons of new characters on the show this year. We are very blessed with the new guest cast. Do you want us to talk about Aidan or no?

SAM HUNTINGTON: Do we need to?

 

MARK STERN: Talk about the guest cast. It's a good entre to Aidan's character, and, like, their—

MEAGHAN RATH: Okay.

MARK STERN: We have a new—

MEAGHAN RATH: Well, we have Dichen Lachman this year, who is playing Suran, who is a very old vampire. How old is she?

Sam WitwerSAM WITWER: Over 700 years old.

MEAGHAN RATH: Okay. All right.

SAM HUNTINGTON: That's old. I thought she was, like, 37.

MEAGHAN RATH: Really, really old vampire.

SAM HUNTINGTON: She's really old.

SAM WITWER: Old.

MEAGHAN RATH: And we also have Kyle Schmidt, who plays Henry—

SAM WITWER: Uh-huh.

MEAGHAN RATH: -- who is an awesome addition.

SAM WITWER: Yeah. Aidan is—he's dealing with—there's all of these identity—really neat identity issues throughout this season because as you—as we saw last year, we went back to it a few times. We went to the '50s. We went to the '70s. We are going way back to the '80s with a keystar player and a band that Bishop was a singer, and there's this whole thing of, like, "But I want to be the singer. You be the keystar player."

MEAGHAN RATH: That was—

SAM HUNTINGTON: It's a story you've seen a hundred times.

SAM WITWER: Because we always know between the singer and the keytar player—

SAM HUNTINGTON: Right.

SAM WITWER: -- there's conflict.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah.

SAM WITWER: No. When we go back to the '30s—and we discover a time when the vampires weren't taking these awful day jobs that they didn't want to be taking, and they didn't have to hide as hard core as they do in modern day. And then we even go back to 1918, and we learn what happened before then. We discover Aidan perhaps at the height of his—of his influence and power, and he's doing really, really well. And we learn why they were all scattered and sent into the shadows and they all hide.

And so, as I talk about this identity thing, we really get a strong contrast for who Aidan was and this ideal Aidan. Everyone is talking about him, and you get to see him. And they talk about he was the ideal vampire, and then we learn—then, of course, we know a lot about how Aidan is trying to be in this last two years.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Right.

SAM WITWER: He's known you.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Right.

SAM WITWER: And he just keeps having options removed and avenues of escape, and he's having all of these things taken away from him. And once you have all of your options taken away, you really do learn who you really are, not who you want to be and not who you were, but who you are. And that's one of the scary things that he goes through this season.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Well put.

MARK STERN: There's sex.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah.

SAM WITWER: That's frightening, right?

SAM HUNTINGTON: Oh, yeah.

MARK STERN: So you have a lot of, kind of, old loves return. And you mentioned the '30s. Talk about that a little bit in terms of some of the things that you guys grapple with in terms of relationships.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Well, yeah.

SAM WITWER: Mr. Johnson's grandmother.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah, yeah. Aidan has a big-time romance with my granny.

SAM WITWER: Yeah.

(Laughter.)

SAM HUNTINGTON: It's wonderful, guys. It's epic, but no. For Josh anyway, he has—I don't know, actually, how much I'm allowed to reveal. In the notes that we were given, it just says—

MEAGHAN RATH: Not there.

Sam HuntingtonSAM HUNTINGTON: -- Josh—"A romance from his past comes back in an unexpected way."

SAM WITWER: That was great.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Do you like that?

SAM WITWER: I like that.

SAM HUNTINGTON: I even give the air quotes there. But that, you know—and one thing I can say is, you know, Nora is still a huge part of Josh's life at the end of Season 1. That continues into Season 2 and gets very, very complicated when said romance from his past comes back. And it's cool for Josh because his need and his wants in life is the thing that he finds most difficult to achieve. So it's—and hurting other people is his biggest fear. And he's a lover, and so it's really, really difficult for him, which has been really fun for me to play. So I think you guys are going to enjoy it, and it's going to be something that maybe you've experienced yourself in life. So hopefully that will be the case, maybe less painful with less hair and blood.

MARK STERN: And the werewolf part.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah. The whole werewolf thing, I don't know if any of you are, but it's unfortunate if you are.

MARK STERN: Don't ask personal questions.

SAM HUNTINGTON: It's not fun. It's painful.

SAM WITWER: Aidan's old love interest, you know, is this Suran character that we mentioned played by Dichen Lachman. And it's interesting because, you know, how many of us have been in situations where we had a major longing for someone, and then, maybe a year or two down the road, we actually have an opportunity to be with that person, and maybe it isn't everything that you thought it would be. You know? And it's trying to figure out—because Aidan had this old love back in the '30s that he had these feelings for, but he was quite literally a different person back then. So to reconnect with that, what does that mean for him? And where is that going to go? And is it the best thing for him? And, you know, does—what does he think about all of this? I mean, does he know that he's perhaps getting himself into trouble, or is this even what he wants anymore? It's very strange, but he gets very caught up in this and all of these identity issues that come out of it.

MEAGHAN RATH: And, well, for Sally, her whole thing is trying to find a purpose. In her death, I mean, that was her goal in life is to have an effect on somebody and feel like she's contributing in some way to the world, and that never happened. So, in her death, her longings are the same. She wants to feel important and special and unique, and so she falls for someone who is living in life and tries to be with him and will do whatever it takes to be with him, which also falls into the whole dangerous category—

SAM WITWER: Dangerous.

MEAGHAN RATH: -- that we were talking about before.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Addictive.

SAM WITWER: Yeah. Your story is really awesome.

SAM HUNTINGTON: It's amazing, yeah. It's so original and imaginative.

MEAGHAN RATH: Yeah.

MARK STERN: Yeah. I have to say that I know that Anna and Jeremy, going into Season 2, one of the big things was Sally's character is a dangerous character because she's a homebody, and there's a danger of that storyline really becoming stagnant, and they really went the other way. It just takes off in such an amazing way this year. So—

SAM WITWER: Well, it's wonderful because it starts like you think you've seen it before.

MARK STERN: Right.

SAM WITWER: And then it grows.

MEAGHAN RATH: Yeah.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah.

SAM WITWER: It just spirals out of control.

MEAGHAN RATH: Yeah.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah. It's really nicely balanced, too, and paced. They've really spread it out nicely and made the arc really, really even.

MEAGHAN RATH: Yeah.

SAM HUNTINGTON: I love that.

MARK STERN: So we are going to open up to your questions. Before we jump in, though, I have one last one, which is, what about Bishop? Like, does he come back?

SAM WITWER: We might—we might see Bishop again. I mean, after all, we have 200 years of history being that guy. So you never know when he just kind of shows up. And Mark Pellegrino is just—I mean, he's tremendous, that guy.

MEAGHAN RATH: Right.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah.

SAM WITWER: He's fun.

SAM HUNTINGTON: I'm superexcited for a couple of things that we've done.

SAM WITWER: Yeah.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Mark has been back in a small capacity this year and has been—it's just been so awesome.

SAM WITWER: Some of the stuff.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah.

SAM WITWER: Yeah.

MARK STERN: All right. Let's go to your question. We have mikes. So—

SAM HUNTINGTON: Save us. You don't get to ask questions. I'm sorry.

QUESTION: The question is how are you feeling after that roller coaster last night?

SAM HUNTINGTON: We were all talking about that this morning.

QUESTION: Jostled?

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah, yeah, yeah. We were feeling, like, is there a study that has been taken, like long-term effects of—

Meaghan RathMEAGHAN RATH: I feel like I have brain damage.

SAM HUNTINGTON: -- persistent—yeah.

SAM WITWER: Your problem—I can tell you this. Your personality has changed fundamentally since last night. You are a lot more violent.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah. Everybody else can see it. You are a different person.

SAM WITWER: It's like Phineas Gage, who had the railroad spike through his groin. You are turning into a different person, but that's you.

MEAGHAN RATH: I feel different.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah.

QUESTION: But my real question is how important is it to explore the origins of the actual—not your characters, but the creatures? I mean, would we ever see, like, the beginning of the vampire race or, like, the very first werewolf or, like, you know, really, really old, old ghosts? Like, is that important, or is it more about just being in the now, in the recent past?

SAM WITWER: In the vampire story, we do go into those directions, and it's—so it gets a little out there, you know. I mean, it's—the challenge is to make that as human as possible because, you know, with this show, say, we are lucky enough to go several seasons. The gimmick is just having people deal with humanity, and you can do that, and that's our show. But we do attempt to go off into this—into a little bit more of an old-school-vampire direction. We hope you like it.

SAM HUNTINGTON: I think the show plays the best when it is grounded in some sort of reality.

SAM WITWER: I agree.

SAM HUNTINGTON: I think the Aidan plot line this year is something that's amazingly cool and going to be superfun to watch, but to be honest, my favorite stuff is when we are all just together—

SAM WITWER: Yeah.

MEAGHAN RATH: Yeah.

SAM HUNTINGTON: -- you know, being normal with our afflictions.

SAM WITWER: Which, as the season continues—

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah.

SAM WITWER: -- we find these people crash together—

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah.

SAM WITWER: -- and suddenly have to deal with each other in very meaningful ways.

MEAGHAN RATH: Thanks, Aaron.

QUESTION: Thank you.

MEAGHAN RATH: Hello.

QUESTION: As promised, here's my first question of the day.

SAM HUNTINGTON: No, no. No, no. We talked about this. I was begging you.

SAM WITWER: Don't do this. You don't have to do this.

QUESTION: Actually, my serious question is what's the most memorable moment that you guys have experienced while filming this show?

SAM WITWER: I don't remember.

QUESTION: I can't answer that political question.

MEAGHAN RATH: Are you—do you mean the three of us together?

QUESTION: Together—together or separately.

SAM WITWER: Well, these guys are the reason I come to work, basically, for me, you know. I'm not a morning person. So every morning I'm like, "Uhhh." So, if I see them, then I feel better.

SAM HUNTINGTON: I think you—although that is with the disclaimer of I think you would, if you could, sleep 24 hours a day.

SAM WITWER: Yeah.

MEAGHAN RATH: Witwer sleeps everywhere.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Literally. He's like, "Oh, God. Do you know what? I've got to go back to sleep." It's 5 p.m.

MEAGHAN RATH: Yeah.

SAM WITWER: I start waking up in the middle of the night.

That's when I'm awake.

SAM HUNTINGTON: That's right.

MEAGHAN RATH: To send your emails.

SAM WITWER: I've been typecast. I'm a night person.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah. The most memorable, I'm really trying to think of, like, one.

MEAGHAN RATH: Yeah. I'll say, for me, it was—I mean, I always say this, but this was one of my favorite moments is in Episode 2 of the first season when we did the—sort of that fantasy sequence. That's where Sally is flying down the stairs. That to me was so special, and it was right at the beginning of our shoot. And it was really a moment with me and the crew and our directors and writers, and it was really nice.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah, which is weird because it didn't play.

SAM WITWER: Yeah. It didn't work.

SAM HUNTINGTON: It didn't work. We watch everything. We were, like, "This is boring."

SAM WITWER: Which is fun.

Being HumanSAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah, just a little weird.

MEAGHAN RATH: But it meant a lot to me.

SAM HUNTINGTON: A little childish.

SAM WITWER: Yeah. Yeah. Peter Pan now, all of a sudden.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah, yeah.

SAM WITWER: But, you know, as I've been working with these two jokers, when we had Mark back this year, that was—because he's one of the architects of the show.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Right.

SAM WITWER: He's one of the guys that built the show with us. So, when we had him back, I felt like that was some of my best stuff this year, you know. I really felt like we were on fire and doing some really cool stuff that was, by the way, different from what we've seen from those two characters.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Right, right, right, very different.

SAM WITWER: There's very—Mark is so good. There's very little that he has to say to me to get under my skin as an actor, and we just, you know, go back and forth. And then—and then, between days we were working, we were just hanging out at my place, playing "Left for Dead" together.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah, just a couple of dudes.

SAM WITWER: Just dudes. Just getting—

SAM HUNTINGTON: Sweatpants.

SAM WITWER: You just don't know when you take your shirt off.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Sweat pants.

SAM WITWE: -- of course. Come on in. Take your shirt off.

Don't be rude about it. Don't make this weird.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Don't make this weird for me.

SAM WITWER: "Take the XBox controller. No. Sit closer. Take your shirt off."

SAM HUNTINGTON: If you are not going to take your shirt off, get out.

SAM WITWER: Your feet look so tense. Why don't you let me rub them for you.

(Referring to Meaghan Rath.)

SAM HUNTINGTON: I had a moment actually this year with Nora that was—I think it's in Episode 3, this coming season. So I can't—I actually really can't talk to you much about it, but it's very, very, very, very emotional and hits really close to home for me, and—

SAM WITWER: Gosh. Which one? All of the stuff is awesome.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah. I'm very happy with all of that stuff this year, to be honest, but there's one scene in particular that I'm like, I think is going to be a very, very difficult scene for people to watch, especially people who have gone through what we are going through. This is a very human thing, so anyway, like that.

MARK STERN: I think we have time for one more. Over here.

QUESTION: Hey, guys. I'm actually loving the show.

SAM HUNTINGTON: We absolutely love you. Yeah, yeah.

QUESTION: The thing I wanted to ask is how much of the effects are, like, makeup and digital? I mean, like, the black eyes and stuff, do you have to wear contact lenses? And flying down the stairs, do they have you on a cable, or is that kind of done later, digitally?

MEAGHAN RATH: Well, for me, anything with flying and levitation is—they make a body cast for me. So when I was on my stomach, flying down, it was a front—what? What?

SAM WITWER: She would walk on stage and go, "Hey, guys, look at my body cast."

MEAGHAN RATH: You just can't bend your knees in it because it goes past the knees.

SAM HUNTINGTON: She's walking in a body cast.

SAM WITWER: And he's got this pole coming out of her.

MEAGHAN RATH: Oh, yeah. Yeah. There's a pole coming out of my stomach, and, you know, two or three large men just pretty much tip me over and impale me on this giant stake that's sticking out of a green studio.

SAM WITWER: The magic of movie-making.

SAM HUNTINGTON: A normal day at work

MEAGHAN RATH: It's all very glamorous.

SAM HUNTINGTON: A really normal day at work.

SAM WITWER: The eyes and the fangs are—you wear them, you know. They are contacts and fangs. I have a very easy job. You don't, though.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Yeah. Well, I mean, what I was going to say is it's, like, 50/50, right? So, like, with—you know, it's half practical, and the practical side of it enables you to fill in the blanks with CG. So it's like Meaghan's bed pan or Witwer's fangs and eyes like, you know—we'll call it a "bed pan." You know, the CG will make his eyes snap black, but then, from that point on, he's wearing the contacts.

SAM WITWER: Yeah.

SAM HUNTINGTON: The fangs grow as CG, obviously, but then—

SAM WITWER: Unless we are doing a fight scene three feet away from a 30-foot drop, which we did—

SAM HUNTINGTON: Right, right.

SAM WITWER: -- with no railing or anything.

SAM HUNTINGTON: Right, right, right.

SAM WITWER: Bad take. Sure. Let's shoot it again.

MEAGHAN RATH: Really?

SAM WITWER: Yeah, we did. We did.

MEAGHAN RATH: Are you okay?

MARK STERN: It was the last shot of the day.

SAM WITWER: Yeah. It was at 4 a.m.

SAM HUNTINGTON: And really tired, too.

SAM WITWER: Really tired, yeah.

Being HumanSAM HUNTINGTON: My stuff is a lot of—a lot of practical, physical makeup effects, which is both fun and exhausting, and it's in stages. So, in between the stages, there's computer-generated stuff that kind of takes the in-between and fills in the blanks. It's really, like, right down the middle, 50/50.

MARK STERN: Okay. These guys are going to be right down here for the next 10 minutes or so if you want to ask any other questions of them. Otherwise—

SAM HUNTINGTON: Thank you, guys. Thank you, guys, so much.

(Applause.)

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